an online Instagram web viewer

#japanesegoverment medias

Photos

The Japanese Air Force One / Boeing747-47C
#japaneseairforceone #jasdf🇯🇵 #hanedaairport✈ #japanesegoverment #11july2017📷
Pray for the people who passed away on 311 in Japan 🙏 
#CannotBelieve #JapaneseGoverment #ExportingNewclearToWorld #CannotEvenFix #NewclearPowerPlantYet #NoNukes
The Japanese government abandon the Northeast people.

#Japanesegoverment
#japan
Merchant of death.
What Goes Around Comes Around.

#merchantofdeath
#防衛装備庁
#japanesegoverment
戦時に日本が侵略した国で使っていた紙幣を、
カナダ人の女の子が見せてくれた。
なんか複雑。

#japanesegoverment #money
戦時に日本が侵略した国で使っていた紙幣を、 カナダ人の女の子が見せてくれた。 なんか複雑。 #japanesegoverment  #money 
Lite jobbigt är det. #japanesegoverment
by @seaslaverysucks "Izumi Ishii, an ex-Japanese dolphin fisherman, sits down for an interview with 60 Minutes Australia. He says he began hunting dolphins in elementary school. When asked how many dolphins he killed during his career, Ishii says countless but definitely more than thousands. He was a 3rd generation dolphin hunter and his village lacked a butcher, so he grew up believing the consumption of dolphin was good and common. However, with each life taken a deeper burden grew on him—Ishii felt regretful and sorry, for he knew the dolphins felt pain.

In 1997, Ishii severed ties from the other fishermen. Today he is fighting for an end to this Japanese practice. He says that dolphin slaughters continue because fishermen are legally allowed to hunt them. Ishii believes the only way to end this killing is to put pressure on the Japanese government to make it illegal. He urges anyone and everyone to write a letter to the officials of Japan. So far, he has received over 900 letters.

To watch this 3-minute segment and/or to read more, look at the article "Former Cove Hunter: 'I Felt Sorry For The Dolphins'" on thedodo.com." via @PhotoRepost_app 🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬
by @seaslaverysucks "Izumi Ishii, an ex-Japanese dolphin fisherman, sits down for an interview with 60 Minutes Australia. He says he began hunting dolphins in elementary school. When asked how many dolphins he killed during his career, Ishii says countless but definitely more than thousands. He was a 3rd generation dolphin hunter and his village lacked a butcher, so he grew up believing the consumption of dolphin was good and common. However, with each life taken a deeper burden grew on him—Ishii felt regretful and sorry, for he knew the dolphins felt pain. In 1997, Ishii severed ties from the other fishermen. Today he is fighting for an end to this Japanese practice. He says that dolphin slaughters continue because fishermen are legally allowed to hunt them. Ishii believes the only way to end this killing is to put pressure on the Japanese government to make it illegal. He urges anyone and everyone to write a letter to the officials of Japan. So far, he has received over 900 letters. To watch this 3-minute segment and/or to read more, look at the article "Former Cove Hunter: 'I Felt Sorry For The Dolphins'" on thedodo.com." via @PhotoRepost_app 🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬🐬