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  • ekrtachrome
    Eric K. Roberts
    @ekrtachrome

Images by ekrtachrome

Nick [Yerma almost wrapped its second weekend! One more night, Monday, one of two industry nights we're putting on during the run. (The other is Dec. 4.) 4546 N Western Ave., 7:30PM, $10. See Nick!]
Nick [Yerma almost wrapped its second weekend! One more night, Monday, one of two industry nights we're putting on during the run. (The other is Dec. 4.) 4546 N Western Ave., 7:30PM, $10. See Nick!]
Katie [Friends! Theatre Y's production of Yerma opened at The Ready in Lincoln Square last weekend! So proud of our show, our ensemble. Come see us! Through Dec. 10.]
Katie [Friends! Theatre Y's production of Yerma opened at The Ready in Lincoln Square last weekend! So proud of our show, our ensemble. Come see us! Through Dec. 10.]
Melissa [Friends! Theatre Y's production of Yerma opened at The Ready in Lincoln Square last weekend! So proud of our show, our ensemble. Come see us! Through Dec. 10.]
Melissa [Friends! Theatre Y's production of Yerma opened at The Ready in Lincoln Square last weekend! So proud of our show, our ensemble. Come see us! Through Dec. 10.]
The Man with the Yellow Hat [Halloween throwbacks.]
The Man with the Yellow Hat [Halloween throwbacks.]
George [Halloween throwbacks.]
George [Halloween throwbacks.]
Marge [Halloween throwbacks.]
Marge [Halloween throwbacks.]
Laurie [I posted these already over @theatrey, but for my friends: our fall production, Yerma, by Federico Garcia Lorca, directed by Max Truax, opens tonight at The Ready in Lincoln Square, 4546 N Western Ave. I sing and dance! Through Dec. 10. (Link in our bio for tickets.)]
Laurie [I posted these already over @theatrey, but for my friends: our fall production, Yerma, by Federico Garcia Lorca, directed by Max Truax, opens tonight at The Ready in Lincoln Square, 4546 N Western Ave. I sing and dance! Through Dec. 10. (Link in our bio for tickets.)]
Katie [I posted these already over @theatrey, but for my friends: our fall production of Yerma, by Federico Garcia Lorca, directed by Max Truax, opens tomorrow night at The Ready in Lincoln Square, 4546 N Western Ave. Come see us! Through Dec. 10. (There's a link in our bio for tickets.)]
Katie [I posted these already over @theatrey, but for my friends: our fall production of Yerma, by Federico Garcia Lorca, directed by Max Truax, opens tomorrow night at The Ready in Lincoln Square, 4546 N Western Ave. Come see us! Through Dec. 10. (There's a link in our bio for tickets.)]
Adrian [I posted these already over on the @theatrey page, but for my friends: Yerma, by Federico Garcia Lorca, directed by Max Truax, opens tomorrow night at The Ready in Lincoln Square, 4546 N Western Ave. I'm in it! Through Dec. 10.]
Adrian [I posted these already over on the @theatrey page, but for my friends: Yerma, by Federico Garcia Lorca, directed by Max Truax, opens tomorrow night at The Ready in Lincoln Square, 4546 N Western Ave. I'm in it! Through Dec. 10.]
[The Hyde Park Community Players are putting on their annual "Evening of Horror and Suspense" tonight at Augustana Lutheran Church. Here's one more portrait I made when I was part of the show a couple of years ago. (At this time I can't remember the woman's name.) Good times!]
[The Hyde Park Community Players are putting on their annual "Evening of Horror and Suspense" tonight at Augustana Lutheran Church. Here's one more portrait I made when I was part of the show a couple of years ago. (At this time I can't remember the woman's name.) Good times!]
Vanessa [The Hyde Park Community Players are putting on their annual "Evening of Horror and Suspense" this Saturday, Oct. 21, at Augustana Lutheran Church. Here're a few portraits I made when I was part of the show a couple of years ago. Good times!]
Vanessa [The Hyde Park Community Players are putting on their annual "Evening of Horror and Suspense" this Saturday, Oct. 21, at Augustana Lutheran Church. Here're a few portraits I made when I was part of the show a couple of years ago. Good times!]
Shonte & Helena [The Hyde Park Community Players are putting on their annual "Evening of Horror and Suspense" this Saturday, Oct. 21, at Augustana Lutheran Church. This year my friend Shonte Wesson's directing! Here're a few portraits I made when I was part of the show a couple of years ago. Good times!]
Shonte & Helena [The Hyde Park Community Players are putting on their annual "Evening of Horror and Suspense" this Saturday, Oct. 21, at Augustana Lutheran Church. This year my friend Shonte Wesson's directing! Here're a few portraits I made when I was part of the show a couple of years ago. Good times!]
Phil the Phoenix [This is my 400th post. (Alas, more than double my followers.) I switched the account name. After 20 months of this, I can't own "Motherfuckers from Chicago" anymore. Recently I've found myself dancing around the name with art people, strangers on the street, my grandma. Most of the time I just can't bring myself to say it. In case you hadn't figured it out, I was having a little fun at Brandon Stanton's expense, since I've had to suffer the occasional indignity of being compared to him. Nothing against what he does, but it's not exactly what I do (film-versus-digital being for me a crucial distinction; also, Stanton is a collector of stories, whereas I eschew sentimentality), and of course street portraiture didn't start with Stanton. But "Motherfuckers from Chicago" was also meant to raise serious questions about our shared photographic fetishization of humans. In 2012, before I knew who Stanton was, I was in India for six weeks making portraits. I noticed t-shirts all over the country that read, "Being Human," the name of a philanthropic organization founded by the Bollywood actor Salman Khan. I took a few pictures of people wearing these shirts, and thought to name the collection of my photos "Being Human." This is incredibly trite, even were Stanton never to have existed. Yet it is my stubborn feeling that my portraits portray nothing much beyond human physiognomy and style, so naturally I was drawn to something as general and simplistic as "human" to categorize my work: a kind of accounting of vessels. Other portrait artists, helplessly, do the same thing. "Human" this, "body" or "eyes" that--as if nothing else would unify their subjects, or speak to something deeper or more peculiar within them. And I don't blame them. The best I could do for my IG was to put a regional spin on it. (Bernie Mac, from Chicago, took ownership of "motherfucker" in "The Original Kings of Comedy.") "Humans," a bit like New York, is basic. Unfortunately, "motherfuckers" ain't for everybody.

I reserve the right to go back to it, though.]
Phil the Phoenix [This is my 400th post. (Alas, more than double my followers.) I switched the account name. After 20 months of this, I can't own "Motherfuckers from Chicago" anymore. Recently I've found myself dancing around the name with art people, strangers on the street, my grandma. Most of the time I just can't bring myself to say it. In case you hadn't figured it out, I was having a little fun at Brandon Stanton's expense, since I've had to suffer the occasional indignity of being compared to him. Nothing against what he does, but it's not exactly what I do (film-versus-digital being for me a crucial distinction; also, Stanton is a collector of stories, whereas I eschew sentimentality), and of course street portraiture didn't start with Stanton. But "Motherfuckers from Chicago" was also meant to raise serious questions about our shared photographic fetishization of humans. In 2012, before I knew who Stanton was, I was in India for six weeks making portraits. I noticed t-shirts all over the country that read, "Being Human," the name of a philanthropic organization founded by the Bollywood actor Salman Khan. I took a few pictures of people wearing these shirts, and thought to name the collection of my photos "Being Human." This is incredibly trite, even were Stanton never to have existed. Yet it is my stubborn feeling that my portraits portray nothing much beyond human physiognomy and style, so naturally I was drawn to something as general and simplistic as "human" to categorize my work: a kind of accounting of vessels. Other portrait artists, helplessly, do the same thing. "Human" this, "body" or "eyes" that--as if nothing else would unify their subjects, or speak to something deeper or more peculiar within them. And I don't blame them. The best I could do for my IG was to put a regional spin on it. (Bernie Mac, from Chicago, took ownership of "motherfucker" in "The Original Kings of Comedy.") "Humans," a bit like New York, is basic. Unfortunately, "motherfuckers" ain't for everybody. I reserve the right to go back to it, though.]