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    Vintage Newsday
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For National Garage Sale Day, look back to a sale on Beech Lane in Stony Brook in 1973. The corresponding @Newsday article by Marilyn Goldstein stated, “It is as American as planned obsolescence, free enterprise, and electric bar-b-ques...It is bargain-hunting while buying unnecessary items. And like the quilting bees and barn raisings of the past, economic-oriented affairs that became social events in themselves, so has the garage sale become an American pastime.” (Photo: Walter del Toro)
For National Garage Sale Day, look back to a sale on Beech Lane in Stony Brook in 1973. The corresponding @Newsday article by Marilyn Goldstein stated, “It is as American as planned obsolescence, free enterprise, and electric bar-b-ques...It is bargain-hunting while buying unnecessary items. And like the quilting bees and barn raisings of the past, economic-oriented affairs that became social events in themselves, so has the garage sale become an American pastime.” (Photo: Walter del Toro)
The first train arrives at the newly opened elevated train station in Rockville Centre in this July, 1950 @Newsday photo. A construction project to raise the track in order to eliminate 10 grade crossings had been riddled with delay and tragedy, including a head-on collision between two trains in a temporary single track territory killing approximate 30 passengers. (Photo: Ike Eichorn)
The first train arrives at the newly opened elevated train station in Rockville Centre in this July, 1950 @Newsday photo. A construction project to raise the track in order to eliminate 10 grade crossings had been riddled with delay and tragedy, including a head-on collision between two trains in a temporary single track territory killing approximate 30 passengers. (Photo: Ike Eichorn)
A less-than-anticipated crowd listens to a band at the Long Island Summer Festival at the Islip Speedway in this 1974 @Newsday photo. Promoters expected filling the venue to its 20,000 person capacity, but only about 2,000 fans attended. Disappointed promoters credited the poor attendance to a lack of major headliners. “People are just into superstars, and that’s it,” said promoter Bruce Zaktzer. (Photo: David Pokress)
A less-than-anticipated crowd listens to a band at the Long Island Summer Festival at the Islip Speedway in this 1974 @Newsday photo. Promoters expected filling the venue to its 20,000 person capacity, but only about 2,000 fans attended. Disappointed promoters credited the poor attendance to a lack of major headliners. “People are just into superstars, and that’s it,” said promoter Bruce Zaktzer. (Photo: David Pokress)
An irate Deer Park mother chases and swings her purse at her son who was absent from class when he joined a demonstration protesting the expulsion of three fellow classmates in this 1966 @Newsday photo. The mother, who refused to provide her name, received a call at home that her son was picketing. “I’ll fracture him. This is a disgrace,” she proclaimed. The boy, along with about 200 other students, were eventually corralled back to class. (Photo: Dick Kraus)
An irate Deer Park mother chases and swings her purse at her son who was absent from class when he joined a demonstration protesting the expulsion of three fellow classmates in this 1966 @Newsday photo. The mother, who refused to provide her name, received a call at home that her son was picketing. “I’ll fracture him. This is a disgrace,” she proclaimed. The boy, along with about 200 other students, were eventually corralled back to class. (Photo: Dick Kraus)
A crowd packs the bar at the Bijou, a discotheque on Route 110 in Farmingdale in this August, 1975 @Newsday photo. That year Long Island experienced a flood of new and busy discos which one local club owner credited the craze in part to the Hustle. “What’s made these places is that dance,” said Peter Norberto, owner of Poor Peter’s Parlor, also located in Farmingdale. (Photo: David Pokress)
A crowd packs the bar at the Bijou, a discotheque on Route 110 in Farmingdale in this August, 1975 @Newsday photo. That year Long Island experienced a flood of new and busy discos which one local club owner credited the craze in part to the Hustle. “What’s made these places is that dance,” said Peter Norberto, owner of Poor Peter’s Parlor, also located in Farmingdale. (Photo: David Pokress)
In this 1961 @Newsday photo, children swing out over the Shinnecock Canal and drop into the water near the new bridge which was almost ready to open to Sunrise Highway traffic. (Photo: Max Heine)
In this 1961 @Newsday photo, children swing out over the Shinnecock Canal and drop into the water near the new bridge which was almost ready to open to Sunrise Highway traffic. (Photo: Max Heine)
Coast Guardsman Samuel Catz changes a lightbulb at the peak of the Montauk Point Lighthouse in this 1960 @Newsday photo. The men stationed at the lighthouse worked 12-hour days with the prime task to climb to the top of the 108-foot structure every four hours during the night to rewind the mechanism that kept the light turning. Today, that function is mechanized. (Photo: Walter del Toro)
Coast Guardsman Samuel Catz changes a lightbulb at the peak of the Montauk Point Lighthouse in this 1960 @Newsday photo. The men stationed at the lighthouse worked 12-hour days with the prime task to climb to the top of the 108-foot structure every four hours during the night to rewind the mechanism that kept the light turning. Today, that function is mechanized. (Photo: Walter del Toro)
In this 1974 @newsday photo, Dune Road residents Alex Kabbaz and Donna Pyne assembled their handmade candlelabras  in anticipation of losing electricity due to high tides expected in the area. (Photo: Mitch Turner)
In this 1974 @newsday photo, Dune Road residents Alex Kabbaz and Donna Pyne assembled their handmade candlelabras in anticipation of losing electricity due to high tides expected in the area. (Photo: Mitch Turner)
It was a bad day for the owner of this 1971 Volkswagen Beetle, whose car was swallowed up by a cesspool in the parking lot of a restaurant on New York Avenue in Huntington Station. Luckily the VW was unoccupied, but the car, we figure, was a total loss. (1985 @Newsday photo: Bud Quast)
It was a bad day for the owner of this 1971 Volkswagen Beetle, whose car was swallowed up by a cesspool in the parking lot of a restaurant on New York Avenue in Huntington Station. Luckily the VW was unoccupied, but the car, we figure, was a total loss. (1985 @Newsday photo: Bud Quast)
In 2017, America's first suburb turns 70. In this 1967 @newsday photo, Sid Track of South Village Construction rides a horse down Jerusalem Avenue in a parade celebrating Levittown's 20th anniversary. (Photo: Dick Kraus)
In 2017, America's first suburb turns 70. In this 1967 @newsday photo, Sid Track of South Village Construction rides a horse down Jerusalem Avenue in a parade celebrating Levittown's 20th anniversary. (Photo: Dick Kraus)
Fair or fowl? On December 30, 1948, Eileen O’Shea of Manhasset holds a white goose while wearing a hat made of white goose tail feathers at the Madison Square Garden Poultry Show. (@Newsday Photo: Howard Edwards)
Fair or fowl? On December 30, 1948, Eileen O’Shea of Manhasset holds a white goose while wearing a hat made of white goose tail feathers at the Madison Square Garden Poultry Show. (@Newsday Photo: Howard Edwards)
In this 1972 @Newsday photo, folks leave after a day at Hot Dog Beach on Dune Road in the Hamptons. Hot Dog Beach was a popular spot for young people and could attract as many as 10,000 visitors a day, but was shut down in 1986 by the Suffolk County Health Department for lack of lifeguards, safety equipment, and toilets. (Photo: Jim Peppler)
In this 1972 @Newsday photo, folks leave after a day at Hot Dog Beach on Dune Road in the Hamptons. Hot Dog Beach was a popular spot for young people and could attract as many as 10,000 visitors a day, but was shut down in 1986 by the Suffolk County Health Department for lack of lifeguards, safety equipment, and toilets. (Photo: Jim Peppler)
In August of 1955, Lanny Towl, 10, of Garden City crosses the finish line of a Junior Motor Sport Club of Long Island go kart race held in the parking lot across from the Motor Vehicle building in Mineola. (@Newsday Photo: Bill Sullivan)
In August of 1955, Lanny Towl, 10, of Garden City crosses the finish line of a Junior Motor Sport Club of Long Island go kart race held in the parking lot across from the Motor Vehicle building in Mineola. (@Newsday Photo: Bill Sullivan)
In this 1974 @Newsday photo, brothers Frank and Rob Pavone pose outside of their store the Pentangle located at 318 New York Ave. in Huntington, which sold records, clothing, and “paraphernalia.” Frank Pavone said he joined the local chamber of commerce, “…to be cool with the town.” (Photo: Don Jacobsen)
In this 1974 @Newsday photo, brothers Frank and Rob Pavone pose outside of their store the Pentangle located at 318 New York Ave. in Huntington, which sold records, clothing, and “paraphernalia.” Frank Pavone said he joined the local chamber of commerce, “…to be cool with the town.” (Photo: Don Jacobsen)
Patrolmen Paul Arato and Edward Donahue of the Huntington Police check out the department's new Jeep in this 1957 @newsday photo. The 4-wheel drive vehicle would be used for beach patrol and town snow duty. (Photo: Walter deal Toro)
Patrolmen Paul Arato and Edward Donahue of the Huntington Police check out the department's new Jeep in this 1957 @newsday photo. The 4-wheel drive vehicle would be used for beach patrol and town snow duty. (Photo: Walter deal Toro)
Forty years ago today, David Berkowitz, a 24-year-old postal worker from Yonkers, began a killing spree that would terrorize New York City for a year. On July 29, 1976, Berkowitz shot his first two victims in the Bronx, killing Donna Lauria and wounding Jody Valenti. The "Son of Sam" is seen here at the 84th precinct in Brooklyn on August 11, 1977 after his capture. Berkowitz was responsible for killing six people and wounding seven others. (@newsday photo: Stan Wolfson)
Forty years ago today, David Berkowitz, a 24-year-old postal worker from Yonkers, began a killing spree that would terrorize New York City for a year. On July 29, 1976, Berkowitz shot his first two victims in the Bronx, killing Donna Lauria and wounding Jody Valenti. The "Son of Sam" is seen here at the 84th precinct in Brooklyn on August 11, 1977 after his capture. Berkowitz was responsible for killing six people and wounding seven others. (@newsday photo: Stan Wolfson)
On this day in 1929, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis was born in Southampton, NY. In this 1965 @Newsday photo,  Mrs. Kennedy departs a Pan American flight at Kennedy Airport while her daughter Caroline waits below. (Photo: Marvin Sussman)
On this day in 1929, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis was born in Southampton, NY. In this 1965 @Newsday photo, Mrs. Kennedy departs a Pan American flight at Kennedy Airport while her daughter Caroline waits below. (Photo: Marvin Sussman)
Marie Schairer of Brookhaven National Laboratory’s biology department tests plants for the effects of gamma radiation in this 1957 @Newsday photo. (Photo: Max Heine)
Marie Schairer of Brookhaven National Laboratory’s biology department tests plants for the effects of gamma radiation in this 1957 @Newsday photo. (Photo: Max Heine)